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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 90-97

The incidence, severity and etiology of injuries in players competing in the Saudi Premier League between 2010 and 2012


1 Saudi National Football Team, Prince Mohammad Bin Naf Medical Centre, KFSC, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Football Exchange, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 3AF, UK
2 Football Exchange, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 3AF, UK

Correspondence Address:
Barry Drust
Football Exchange, Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 3AF, UK

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DOI: 10.4103/1319-6308.123388

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Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence of injuries sustained by Saudi Premier League clubs over two consecutive competitive seasons (2010/11 and 2011/2012. Specifically, we compared injuries sustained in match play versus training and we provide an initial exploration of the impact of environmental conditions on match play injuries. Materials and Methods: A total of 198 players were studied (mean ± SD; age 28.2 ± 1.8 year; height 177.3 ± 1.0 cm; weight 71.6 ± 1.4 kg; body mass index 22.8 ± 0.3 kg/m 2 ). A prospective cohort design was used to investigate the injuries that occurred in training and match play. Injury definition was set at "any injury that resulted in medical attention or assessment, irrespective of the impact on time lost from subsequent football activity." Club medical staff recorded injuries and match play and training exposure on a standard proforma. Ambient temperature and relative humidity were recorded for all games. Results: A total of 617 injuries were recorded at an incidence rate of 8.3 injuries/1,000 h player exposure. 355 injuries were recorded during training (5.5/1,000 h) and 262 during match play (29.7/1,000 h). For total injuries as well as subcategories of severity, location, type, recurrence, diagnosis and the role of contact, the incidence rate was substantially higher with match play. Post-hoc categorization of ambient weather suggests a greater risk of match play injury in hot (>30΀C) and dry (<50% relative humidity) conditions. Conclusion: This study detailed the total "medical-attention" injury load presented by professional football players to medical teams in 6 Saudi Premier League Clubs. Injury incidence was higher in match play than training and match play. This data provisionally indicates that injuries may be mediated by the prevailing environmental conditions.


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