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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 27-31

The effect of running on femoral bone mineral density


1 Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Al-Azaritah, Alexandria, Egypt
2 Department of Clinical and Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Al-Azaritah, Alexandria, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Sarah Sayed El-Tawab
Department of Physical Medicine, Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Medaan El Khartoom Square, Al-Azaritah, Alexandria
Egypt
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-6308.197466

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Background: Mechanical loading plays an essential role in the bone remodeling regulation. Running is a medium impact aerobic activity, which has been previously reported as exerting both positive and negative impacts on skeletal health. Aim: To study the effect of running on femoral bone mineral density (BMD), testosterone, and osteocalcin level among young male runners. Subjects and Methods: The study was carried out on 20 male runners aged between 18 and 25 years. Twenty healthy age-matched sedentary men were enrolled as a control group. BMD at the femoral neck, Ward's triangle, greater trochanter, and total femur was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in all participants. The Z-score was selected for BMD assessment. Serum calcium, phosphorous, testosterone, and osteocalcin level were measured. Results: Runners had significantly higher BMD at all sites (P < 0.01). Runners had a higher serum osteocalcin (15.729 ± 13.722 vs. 4.980 ± 1.3724 ng/ml, P = 0.002) and lower serum testosterone level (3.844 ± 1.617 vs. 5.994 ± 2.190 ng/ml, P = 0.001). Serum level of osteocalcin and the duration of running were correlated positively with BMD among runners. Conclusion: This study confirms the positive osteogenic effect of running on BMD.


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