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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 71-74

Impact of upper crossed syndrome on pulmonary function among the recreational male players: A preliminary report


1 Department of Sports Physiotherapy, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Neuro Physiotherapy, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of Ortho Physiotherapy, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Selvaraj Sudhakar
Department of Sports Physiotherapy, Faculty of Physiotherapy, Dr. M.G.R. Educational and Research Institute University, Maduravoyal, Chennai - 600 095, Tamil Nadu
India
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DOI: 10.4103/sjsm.sjsm_51_17

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Background: The upper crossed syndrome (UCS) is the one where participants present with rounded shoulders and a poked chin posture due to muscular imbalance that affects head position, spine, and shoulder girdle. The presence of this syndrome leads to secondary health problems such as myofascial trigger points, cervicogenic headache, impingement syndromes, neck pain, rotator cuff injury, and reduced lung capacity. Objective: The objective of this study is to find the impact of UCS on respiration among the recreational male players. Methodology: Sixty recreational male players were recruited in two stratified age groups, 21–30 years (Group A) and 31–40 years (Group B), and were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Among them, 30 were healthy male recreational male players while thirty recreational male players with UCS. The lung function in both the groups was compared with the two stratified age groups and analyzed. Results: Recreational male players with UCS in both the stratified age groups, 21–30 years and 30–40 years, have reduced maximum voluntary ventilation when compared to their healthy counterparts. Conclusion: Recreational male players with UCS have lower pulmonary performance when compared with their age-matched normal individuals.


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