About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
Home Print this page Email this page Users Online: 275

 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 121-122

Prevalence of low back pain among medical practitioners in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication6-Jun-2017

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Baghdad
Iraq
Login to access the Email id


DOI: 10.4103/1319-6308.207573

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Prevalence of low back pain among medical practitioners in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh. Saudi J Sports Med 2017;17:121-2

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Prevalence of low back pain among medical practitioners in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh. Saudi J Sports Med [serial online] 2017 [cited 2021 May 6];17:121-2. Available from: https://www.sjosm.org/text.asp?2017/17/2/121/207573

Sir,

I have two comments on the interesting study by Almalki et al. on the prevalence of low back pain (LBP) among medical practitioners (MPs) in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh.[1]

First, the authors mentioned that the lifetime prevalence of back pain among the studied population was found to be 83.9%.[1] I presume that study results could be made more informative if the authors considered the following two points. (1) The authors did not mention the exact prevalence of LBP in each category of MPs. This point is important to be clearly addressed as the prevalence of LBP varies among various categories of MPs where dentists have been found to have a higher incidence of work-related musculoskeletal pain than those in other occupations.[2] (2) The authors studied only the distribution of the body mass index, as a risk factor, among the studied cohort with LBP. It would be more worthy if the authors had studied other workplace-related risk factors contributing to LBP, particularly working in uncomfortable postures, working in the same position for long periods, repetitive movement (twisting, bending) of the lumbar region, walking, stress, prolonged sitting, standing for long periods, heavy lifting, smoking, and the effect of exercise as a protective factor. This point is important to be considered as occupational LBP is regarded to be the most expensive form of work disability, with the socioeconomic costs of persistent LBP exceeding the costs of acute and subacute LBP by far.[3] This renders the early identification of MPs at risk of developing persistent LBP fundamental.

Second, the significant prevalence of LBP among MPs reported by Almalki et al. (83.9%)[1] and that reported worldwide (33%–68%)[4] actually triggers the need for the sensitive tool for early LBP diagnosis at hospital settings. A tree model has been developed that explained 80% of variance in LBP risk levels using standing hours/day (90% in relative importance), job status/sitting hours/day (80% each), body mass index (71%), working days/week (63%), domestic activity hours/week (36%), weight (35%), job dissatisfaction/sitting on ergonomic chairs (30% each), height (28%), gender (27%), sufficient break time (26%), using handling techniques/age (25% each), job stress (24%), marital status/wearing orthopedic insoles/extra professional activity (22% each), practicing prevention measures (20%), children care hours/week (16%), and type of sport activity/sports hours/week, car sitting, and fear of changing work due to LBP (15% each). The overall accuracy of this predictive tree once compared with actual subjects was estimated to be 77%. This tree model could be employed by expert physicians in their decision-making for LBP diagnosis among hospital staff.[5]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Almalki M, Alkhudhayri MH, Batarfi AA, Alrumaihi SK, Alshehri SH, Aleissa SI, et al. Prevalence of low back pain among medical practitioners in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh. Saudi J Sports Med 2016;16:205-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Al-Mohrej OA, AlShaalan NS, Al-Bani WM, Masuadi EM, Almodaimegh HS. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain of the neck, upper extremities and lower back among dental practitioners working in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: A cross-sectional study. BMJ Open 2016;6:e011100.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Melloh M, Elfering A, Stanton TR, Käser A, Salathé CR, Barz T, et al. Who is likely to develop persistent low back pain? A longitudinal analysis of prognostic occupational factors. Work 2013;46:297-311.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Oude Hengel KM, Visser B, Sluiter JK. The prevalence and incidence of musculoskeletal symptoms among hospital physicians: A systematic review. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2011;84:115-9.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Mendelek F, Caby I, Pelayo P, Kheir RB. The application of a classification-tree model for predicting low back pain prevalence among hospital staff. Arch Environ Occup Health 2013;68:135-44.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1494    
    Printed49    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded60    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal