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RELATIONSHIP STUDY
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 64-68

Dynamic balance and selected anthropometric variables of volleyball players: A relationship study


Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, Vinaya Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan, West Bengal, India

Date of Submission16-May-2021
Date of Acceptance14-Aug-2021
Date of Web Publication02-Oct-2021

Correspondence Address:
Krishnendu Ghosh
Gadadharpur, P.O – Darpashila, PS – Santiniketan, Birbhum - 731 204, West Bengal
India
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DOI: 10.4103/sjsm.sjsm_13_21

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  Abstract 


Background: Volleyball is one of the popular games in the world. The objectiv of the game is to cross the ball above the net to ground it to the opponent's court to win a rally, which demand heighted players with high qualities of aerobic and anaerobic efficiency along with other motor qualities such as speed, strength, endurance and Balance. Balance is one of the important fitness components to perform skill more successfully. Balance is the ability to maintain the body's center of gravity over the center of supporting base of the body.
Aims: The Purpose of the study is to find out the relationship between dynamic balance and selected anthropometric variables of volleyball players.
Settings and Design: Purposive Design was used
Methods and Material: Total 15 male district level volleyball players were selected as subjects for this study from Bolpur, Birbhum, West Bengal. Dynamic balance, height, weight and BMI ware considered as the variables of the study. The age of the subject was 18-24 years.
Statistical analysis used: Descriptive Statistics and Pearson Product Moment Correlation of coefficient were used. To calculate the collected data social science statistics (Online software) was used.
Results: The result shows that negative relation was found between dynamic balance and height, dynamic balance and weight , dynamic balance and BMI.
Conclusions: Inverse relationship was found between height, weight,BMI with Dynamic balance of district level male Volleyball players.

Keywords: Anthropometric variables, dynamic balance, volleyball


How to cite this article:
Ghosh K, Biswas S, Chatterjee K. Dynamic balance and selected anthropometric variables of volleyball players: A relationship study. Saudi J Sports Med 2021;21:64-8

How to cite this URL:
Ghosh K, Biswas S, Chatterjee K. Dynamic balance and selected anthropometric variables of volleyball players: A relationship study. Saudi J Sports Med [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 8];21:64-8. Available from: https://www.sjosm.org/text.asp?2021/21/2/64/327483






  Introduction Top


Volleyball is one of the popular games in the world. The objective of the game is to cross the ball above the net to ground it to the opponent's court to win a rally. The height of the net for men is 2.43 m. The game demand heighted players with high qualities of aerobic and anaerobic efficiency along with other motor qualities such as speed, strength, and endurance.

The game required repeated maximum jump to execute the skills such as spiking and blocking and also required greater agility to perform other defensive skills.

To perform every skill with greater proficiency, every player required another important fitness component that is balance.

It also helps prevent injury. Balance is the ability to maintain the body's center of gravity over the center of supporting base of the body. There are two types of balance: One is static and another is dynamic.

Static balance means holding stationary position for a reasonable long duration in comparatively less stable position.

Dynamic balance means the ability to maintain the body balance during vigorous movements.[1]

Various neurophysiological and mechanical factors can affect the balance. Features such as height, weight body composition, base of support, the distance of center of mass from the ground, the length and weight of each limb, the length of muscles' torque arm, and the mass distribution in different body points can mechanically affect the individuals' balance.[2],[3]

On the other hand, anthropometric measurements mean quantitative measurements of the muscle, bone, and adipose tissue used to assess the composition of the body. The main components of anthropometry are height, weight, body mass index (BMI), body circumferences (waist, hip, and limbs), and skinfold thickness. Anthropometric measurements are the baseline for physical fitness and to measure the improvement of that fitness.[4]

Anthropometric characteristic and balance play an important role in achieving better performance in volleyball as well as other sports.

Hence, the basic intention of the researchers is to find out is there any relationship exist between.

On the basis of preliminary research reviews, the researcher frame this study with a basic intention to investigate whether any relationship exist between dynamic balance and selected anthropometric variables of volleyball players or not. The data were collected in 2 alternative days of the selected variables. In first, the data were collected on dynamic balance and the next day on selected anthropometric variables.


  Methods Top


Participants

In total, 15 male district-level volleyball players were purposively selected as subjects for this study from Bolpur, Birbhum, West Bengal, India. The age of the subjects was 18–24 years. All the subjects were physically and mentally fit and no history of any severe illness. All the participants were informed about the procedure of the study, and they agreed to provide all the necessary data to conduct this study.

Inclusion criteria

  1. Dynamic balance, height, weight, and BMI ware the variables for the study.


Exclusion criteria

  1. Food habit, economical factor
  2. Motivation and interest of the subjects.


Procedure

The researcher explained to all the players about the study thoroughly and also explained about the testing procedure in details. All the participants were agreed to provide necessary information. Dynamic balance was assessed by modified bass test; anthropometric variables such as height, weight, and BMI were assessed by measuring tape, weighing machine, and BMI being calculated body weight/height2, respectively.

Modified bass test for dynamic balance

Equipment

A stopwatch, 3/4 inch wide marking tape, score sheet, floor space measuring tape were the equipment used.

Test administration

First of all 11 pieces of marking tape, measuring 1 × 3/4 inch size, are cut and pasted on the floor with proper measurement of 30 inch and 15 inch distance. After marking the required floor pattern, demonstration of the test was given. Then, the researchers describe the instruction. The subject was asked to stand the right foot on the starting tape mark and to leap to the first tape mark with the left foot Details shows in [Figure 1]. He is required to maintain balance on the ball of the left foot as long as possible up to maximum 5 s after which he was to leap to the second tape mark with right foot and told to repeat the process completed at first mark. This continues serially with alternate foot up to 10th tape mark. The subject is told clearly that he will get one point for each second to maintain balance up to maximum 5 s and foot must cover the marked tape completely so that the marked tape cannot be seen by the tester/timer when the subject maintains the balance.
Figure 1: Diagram of Modified Bass Test

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Scoring

100 points was given to perform the test properly, of which 50 points for proper landing and 50 points for maintaining the balance. If the performer lands improperly, he will get zero point out of five points of landing, but he continues the test to earn the point for maintain balance of each marked tape.[5]

Anthropometric variables

Height

A measuring tape was pasted on wall vertically. Subject asked to stand straight in such a way that buttock touches on the wall, and feet should be flat and look straight. A ruler is placed on the top of the head parallel to the floor and taken the reading in centimeters.

Weight

Weight was measured by weighing machine. The subject was asked to stand on the machine with barefoot and light cloth. Then, the reading was taken in kilograms.

Body mass index

BMI was calculated body weight/height2.

Statistical procedure

For the purpose of understanding the relationship between dynamic balance and selected anthropometric variables, descriptive statistics and Pearson's product moment correlation of coefficient were used at 0.05 level of significance. To calculate the collected data, social science statistics (Online software) was used.[6] The study was conducted on 15 male volleyball players and their details Mean, Standard Deviation, Standard Error are shown [Table 1] and Graphical presentation of Mean and standard deviation of Dynamic Balance, Height, Weight and BMI are shown in [Figure 2] and [Figure 3].
Table 1: Descriptive statistics mean and standard deviation and standard error of dynamic balance height, weight, and body mass index

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Figure 2: Graphical Presentation of Height, Weight, Body Mass Index, and Dynamic Balance in respect of mean

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Figure 3: Graphical Presentation of Height, Weight, Body Mass Index, and Dynamic Balance in respect of Standard Deviation

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  Results Top


The result shows that there is negative correlation (r = −0.042) between dynamic balance and height. In case of dynamic balance and weight negative correlation coefficient is found (r = −0.210) . The result also revealed that negative correlation between dynamic balance and BMI, ( r= −0.170) at 0.05 level of significance [Table 2].
Table 2: Pearson correlation coefficient between dynamic balance and height, weight, and body mass index of volleyball players

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  Discussion Top


The purpose of the study was to find out the relationship between dynamic balance and selected anthropometric variables of volleyball players. Kilavuz and Cavlak reported that the balance scores were found to be better as the body length decreased, and the balance scores were to be worse as the body weight increased. Therefore, as the BMI increased, the balance scores were found to be worse. This suggests that body weight, height, and BMI may be an important risk factor for falls and injuries due to balance problems, and hence, it may affect activities of daily living.[7] Erkmen et al. found that body weight and height were positively correlated with static balance in male athletes but did not find any relationship between dynamic balance and body height and weight.[8]

In the present study, the result shows that there was almost negative correlation between dynamic balance and height. On the other hand, there was very low correlation between dynamic balance and weight and between dynamic balance and BMI of male volleyball players. In between dynamic balance and height, it may be due to the short training age. We also know that the balance depends on the center of gravity and volleyball is such a sport where height considers as one of the most important factors. However, in between dynamic balance and weight, it may be due to the training age, fitness, coordination, reaction time vestibular system, and fat. More fat means less muscle mass, and it also lead to less strength which is a factor to maintain balance. BMI depend on height and weight, in this study weight and height shows negative relationship with dynamic balance that'why BMI shows negative relationship with dynamic balance.


  Conclusions Top


Inverse relationship was found between height and dynamic balance of district-level male volleyball players

Inverse relationship was found between weight and dynamic balance of district-level male volleyball players.

Inverse relationship was found between dynamic balance and BMI of district-level male volleyball player.

Acknowledgment

The authors want to express sincere gratitude and special thanks to the participants of Bolpur, Birbhum, West Bengal, India, who voluntarily participated in this study and for their immense contributions and endless support to complete the current study. We would also like to acknowledge the coaches.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Kansal DK. Textbook of Applied Measurement, Evaluation and Sports Selection. New Delhi, India: Sport and Spiritual Science Publication; 2008. p. 317.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Palmieri RM, Ingersoll CD, Cordova ML, Kinzey SJ, Stone MB, Krause BA. The effect of a simulated knee joint effusion on postural control in healthy subjects. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2003;84:1076-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Tabrizi HB, Abbasi A, Sarvestani HJ. Comparing the static and dynamic balances and their relationship with the anthropometrical characteristics in the athletes of selected sports. Middle East J Sci Res 2013;15:216-21.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Casadei K, Kiel J. Anthropometric measurement. In StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL); StatPearls Publishing; 2021. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK537315/. [Last access on 2021 Aug 10].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Kansal DK. Textbook of Applied Measurement, Evaluation & Sports Selection. New Delhi, India: Sport and Spiritual Science Publication; 2008. p. 322-323.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Available from: https://www.socscistatistics.com/tests/pearson/default2.aspx. [Last access on 2021 Aug 10].  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Kilavuz G, Cavlak U. Analysing the relationship between physical parameters and balance ability in healthy young males. J Sport Kinet Mov 2017;29:37-44.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Erkmen N, Suveren S, Göktepe AS, Yazıcıoğlu K. The comparison of balance performance of the athletes who are in different branches. SPORTMETRE Journal of Physical Education and Sports Sciences 2007;3:115-22.  Back to cited text no. 8
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]
 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

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