Saudi Journal of Sports Medicine

REVIEW ARTICLE
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 60--62

Sports manpower loss and its impact on sports coaching in a developing country


Amrith Pakkala1, Thippeswamy Raghavendra2, Chitradurga Palaiah Ganashree3,  
1 Department of Physiology, PES Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Kuppam, Chittoor, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Basaveshwara Medical College, Chitradurga, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Physiology, Basaveshwara Medical College, Chitradurga, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Amrith Pakkala
Department of Physiology, PES Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Kuppam, Chittor, Andhra Pradesh
India

Abstract

Sports manpower is an important aspect of coaching services. Most of the countries in the world lack resources for sports coaching; hence, the need for proper allocation and efficient utilization. There is no policy on sports manpower or materials provided in the National Health Policy. In the absence of this, there is nothing in the policy to prevent brain drain of coaches trained on public money. As a developing country, we can ill afford to have the dubious distinction of losing qualified coaches, accounting for highest international certifications and verification of credentials. The government should urgently address the need for arresting the trend of brain drain among qualified coaches.



How to cite this article:
Pakkala A, Raghavendra T, Ganashree CP. Sports manpower loss and its impact on sports coaching in a developing country.Saudi J Sports Med 2013;13:60-62


How to cite this URL:
Pakkala A, Raghavendra T, Ganashree CP. Sports manpower loss and its impact on sports coaching in a developing country. Saudi J Sports Med [serial online] 2013 [cited 2021 Jul 26 ];13:60-62
Available from: https://www.sjosm.org/text.asp?2013/13/2/60/123368


Full Text

 Introduction



For any country, development of sporting activity is largely dependent on the sports manpower status of its citizens. Human health and well-being form the end goal of development. Considering the variables that are frequently used to measure health as of today India does not present a rosy picture.

In September 2002, representatives from 189 countries adopted the United Nations Millennium declaration, which lists the goals in the area of development and poverty eradication. These are popularly known as "millennium development goals (MDG)." These goals are meant to assist in the development of national policies related to health programs. Governments have set a date of 2015 to meet these MDGs. [1],[2]

Sports manpower is an important aspect of sports coaching services. Like most of the countries in the world our country lacks resources for sports coaching; hence, the need for proper allocation and efficient utilization. India is producing annually, an average of 26,449 allopathic doctors, [3] but not enough trained in sports medicine. The ratio of doctor per 1,000 population in India is 0.7 as against a suggested norm of 1/3,500 population. The number of doctors working in rural India in Primary Health Centers as on March 2007 is 22,608. [4],[5],[6]

Our financial resources are considered to be inadequate to furnish a national health service. Approximately, 80% of health facilities are concentrated in urban areas. The rural areas where nearly 72% of the population lives do not enjoy adequate health facilities. [7]

A new National Health Policy was evolved in 2002 with an objective to achieve an acceptable standard of good health amongst the general population of the country. [8]

On review of this National Health Policy 2002, it is clear that there is no policy on sports manpower or materials provided. In the absence of this, there is nothing in the policy to prevent brain drain of doctors trained on public money.

It is pertinent to review the All India health Statistics in [Table 1], millennium development goals in [Table 2], National Health Policy in [Table 3] and ECFMG certificates issued in [Table 4] along with [Figure 1] and [Figure 2]. A study of the 2008 Annual Report of the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), which is the US agency for assessment of international medical graduates ready to enter US graduate medical education programs, reveals the extent of the trend among Indian doctors to go abroad. Aggregate data from the last 25 years reveal that the top five countries of medical schools for applicants achieving certification have been India, Pakistan, Philippines, Grenada and China. [9]{Figure 1}{Figure 2}{Table 1}{Table 2}{Table 3}{Table 4}

Indian medical graduates also account for a major share of Federation Credentials Verification Services with more than 1000 completed requests of the 3132 requests in 2007 and 4851 requests in 2008 received world over by the ECFMG. [9]

 Conclusion



Whenever the Government of India revisits its National Health Policy, it is imperative that sports manpower training facilities are also upgraded. Adequate and practical measures need to be undertaken to arrest the trend of brain drain of Indian medical graduates, especially those trained on public money. This will go a long way in development of sporting activities in the country.

References

1Park K. Park′s text book of preventive and social medicine. 20 th ed. Jabalpur, India: Banarsidas Bhanot; 2009.
2UNDP. Human Development Report 2003, Millennium Development Goals. A Compact Among Nations to End Human Poverty. 2003.
3WHO. The World Health Report 2003, Shaping the future. 2003.
4Govt. of India. Eleventh Five Year Plan, 2007-2012. Vol. 2. Planning Commission; 2007.
5Govt. of India. Annual Report 2007-08. New Delhi: Ministry of Health and family Welfare; 2008.
6Govt. of India. Annual Report 2005-06. New Delhi: Ministry of Health and family Welfare; 2006.
7Govt. of India. Bulletin on Rural Health Statistics in India. New Delhi: DGHS; 2007.
8Govt. of India. National Health Policy 2002. New Delhi: Dept. of Health, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; 2002.
9Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, 2008 Annual Report. Pennsylvania, USA: ECFMG; 2009.